Home architecture varies throughout the country. Being able to identify the most popular designs can be useful if you’re searching for a new house or trying to determine the ideal decorations needed to adorn your interior space.



Craftsman: The craftsman style is reminiscent of the early twentieth-century arts. Typical characteristics include intricate woodworking, detailed stonework, and arched doorways.




Ranch: Modeled after the causal style of western houses, ranch homes include open floor plans, single stories, and L- or U-shaped layouts.




Modern: Modern homes have received inspiration from the Industrial Revolution. These homes include geometric lines, large windows, and integration of materials such as steel and concrete.




Contemporary: This design stems from modern architecture. While modern homes include synthetic materials, the contemporary style focuses on natural materials such as bamboo and boasts multiple windows for maximizing natural light.




Cottage: Cottages get their cozy details—arched doorways and leaded windows—from the 1920s. In addition, they’re smaller houses or bungalows, with generous front porches and second stories tucked into the attic.

 




Colonial: The colonial style has been a long-standing tradition with European influences that date back to the 1600s. These houses are often built of wood and have steep roofs, central front doors, and an overall symmetrical design.




Victorian: Like its name, this style originated from the Victorian era. These large homes are typically two or three stories and have asymmetrical shapes, decorative trim, and large wraparound porches.




Cape Cod: The Cape Cod style is native to America and was developed by early settlers. These houses boast gabled roofs, large central chimneys, and shingle siding.




Farmhouse: The farmhouse style follows many nineteenth-century designs. These homes have simple roof lines, narrow windows, large porches, and wood siding.




Tudor: The Tudor design stems from a combination of late medieval and early Renaissance styles. Specific traits include multigabled rooflines, ornamental framing, and exteriors made of brick, stone stucco, or slate.